VIDEO: “Black on Black Crime” Decoded

By Lawrence Grandpre | Op-Ed

Jun 22

Many people are having conversations about so called “Black on Black crime”, but the people most impacted by and involved with the problem are rarely at the center of the conversation, with elite academic and political “experts” marginalizing indigenous violence.

Also, rarely is the context which produces these conditions analysed.

LBS Baltimore thus presents an new segment, LBS Dialogues”, with “Black on Black Crime”: Decoded as the 1st installment.

We reached out to individuals with actual experience with street organizations to facilitate a more full conversation about the conditions which produce crime, with those who most directly experience these conditions helping to lead and shape the conversation.

Part 1: (Re)Framing the Conversation: The Problem With Discussions Around “Black on Black Crime”

We find that the reality of poverty and violence in these community create the conditions where young people, men especially, have to engage in violence not out of malice, but their own survival and the survival of their families.
 

Part 2: The Role of Culture: How Self Hatred Produces Violence in the Black Community

We find that that education and indoctrination into dominate narrative around Black pathology normalize violence and create the perception that Black life is valueless, which (combine with the dire conditions produced by structural racism) is the root cause of violence.

 

Part 3: Solutions From the Streets

In our final episode, we get perspectives on solutions from people with the most direct connection to the problem.

We find lack of solutions stemming from a devaluing of Black life, and hear about the importance of mentors of and from the community to reach youth at a young age.

Posted: 06/21/15

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About the Author

Lawrence Grandpre is the Director of Research for Leaders of a Beautiful Struggle. His focuses include criminal justice, police accountability, and community-based economic/educational development. He is the co-author of "The Black Book" and his work has been featured in The Guardian and The Baltimore Sun.